Porsche Kremer Racing 930 Turbo

Porsche has been incredibly successful in many forms of motorsport.  In 1962, brothers Erwin and Manfred Kremer founded Kremer Racing in Germany and established a racing team and garage that prepared Porsche’s for competition.  Kremer Racing would go onto play an integral role in Porsche’s triumphant motorsports history.

In 1976, the brothers tuned their first Porsche 935, with the model known as the K1.  In 1977, this became the K2 and then later in 1979, the 935 K3 was developed.  This model earned Kremer Racing outright victory in the 1979 24 Hours of Le Mans.  As a result of the success of the 935’s on the track, in 1979 Formula 1 constructor Walter Wolf approached the brothers about building a street legal 935.  Although primarily focused on building cars for competition, Kremer agreed to this project.

The result was the production of the Porsche Kremer Racing 930 Turbo.  The Kremer had a 3.3 Litre Turbocharged Flat 6 Air cooled engine with a four speed manual gearbox.  The original 300bhp (224kW) of the 930 Turbo was raised to 375bhp (280kW) in basic Kremer spec due to a larger intercooler, turbo (K27) and camshaft.  Kremer’s own stainless steel exhaust and headers boosted power to 410bhp (305kW).

Cosmetically, Kremer offered aero body panels and there was an enlarged rear whale tail spoiler to accommodate the larger intercooler.  The car also had standard 930 Turbo spec Fuchs wheels.  The other significant change was Kremer’s front spoiler secured beneath the bug-eye nose.  Kremer also upgraded braking and handling and the car received stiffer Bilstein dampers.  A couple of cool features of the car were the addition of a Kremer Racing LED Ladedruck boost gauge and a Kremer boost adjuster resting next to the handbrake.

I’ve been fortunate enough to ride in one of these amazing cars.  The Kremer was incredibly quick on boost, and really shoved you back into the seat at about 3,500rpm.  I remember it having no power steering and with a heavy clutch it was difficult to drive in traffic.  It was an incredibly quick car with a relentless surge of power once the turbo was wound up, and the boost controller and LED boost gauge made it very special.  The Kremer Porsche Racing badge on the boot-lid was also a nice touch.

Only 56 Porsche Kremer Racing Turbo’s are thought to exist worldwide and they are a very rare site on Australian roads.  Hopefully the ones that still exist are well maintained as they are an amazing car and a wonderful piece of Porsche history.

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